Skip to main content

About your Search

20121226
20130103
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)
. president vladimir putin has signed a new law banning those adoptions, leaving shocked adults and children wondering what will happen next. here is nbc's kerry sanders. >> reporter: cindy and dennis boyer were weeks away from adopting baby adeline. they met the almost 2-year-old recently as they visited her russian orphanage. but now vladimir putin has signed a law that despite mounds of paperwork and thousands of dollars already spent, all the more than 1,500 adoptions currently under way and any future adoptions are permanently cancelled. >> she's for a home, ready for a family, ready to be loved. >> reporter: why the new adoption law signed so publicly? russian authorities say some of the adopted have been abused or died. one unruly boy was even sent back on a plane alone to russia. also at play here say u.s. experts, retaliation. a visa ban on russian officials accused of human rights violations. >> they're retaliating by holding hostage orphans that otherwise would have homes in the united states. >> reporter: the state department says we deeply regret russia's decision. >> i would as
. sanitation workers picked up an estimated 50 tons of trash. >>> and there are all kinds of new laws across the country. in maryland, same-sex marriage there is legal as of today. and couples rang in 2013 with wedding bells. voters approved that gay marriage measure back in november. that was one of hundreds of new laws that went into effect as the new year began, from new restrictions on the use of social media to an increase in the minimum wage. nbc's justice correspondent, pete williams, has more. >> reporter: beginning today in california and illinois, it's against the law for an employer to ask anyone applying for a job to reveal user names or passwords for social media sites like facebook. johnny says it happened to him at a job interview. >> it's rude and not respectful. someone has privacy. you expect them to respect that. >> reporter: though job placement experts advise leaving embarrassing photos off social media sites, an employer doesn't have the right to rummage through an applicant's past. >> it's like saying, i want the keys to your house to look around. >> reporter: as of to
a week, although arizona law currently prohibits carrying guns on public school grounds. the idea follows of course the school shootings in newtown, connecticut and the nra's call to station armed officers at public schools. >>> and the first step toward a potential lawsuit in connecticut after the shootings at sandy hook elementary. paperwork has been filed for a $100 million claim on behalf of one of the children who lived through the tragedy. a lawyer for the 6-year-old survivor claims she sustained emotional and physical trauma as a result of hearing the assault over the school intercom. it faults the board of education among others for failing to protect the children from, quote, foreseeable harm. >>> in orlando last night a show of solidarity with the newtown victims at the russell athletic bowl. in their game with rutgers virginia tech's players wore a large ribbon on their helmets that read, "58 prevail." it was a reference to the total number of victims from both the newtown, connecticut shootings and the virginia tech shootings. >>> an update tonight on former president george h
, what the new law will mean for you and why the victims of superstorm sandy feel left in the lurch. out of the hospital. late word tonight that hillary clinton has been released from the hospital. >>> constant craving. is one of the most popular ingredients in the american diet making us overeat. tonight, what scientists are able to see for the first time. >>> and making a difference. rebuilding a great american city with a simple bowl of soup and a lot of good ideas. "nightly news" begins now. >>> from nbc news world headquarters in new york, this is "nbc nightly news" with brian williams. >> good evening, i'm kate snow in tonight for brian. after weeks of negotiations and last-minute hold-ups over the fiscal cliff, congress late last night finally passed an agreement on taxes and spending. in a moment, we'll tell you what that legislation means for every american. but it's what the house did not do last night that caused an uproar today. lawmakers left before considering a bill to help victims of superstorm sandy, and that had republicans from hard-hit states taking aim at leaders of
would go back to an outdated law put in place during the truman era. the government would be required to buy dairy products based on 1949 production costs, when milking was done by hand. that would double today's price. farmers would lose incentive to sell directly to producers, and prices in the grocery store would sky rocket. >> it can't happen. it just can't happen. >> reporter: farmers like skip hardy in new york say it would be nice to get high prices from the government at first. but ultimately, this would kill the industry. >> the economy being what it is, if -- the price of anything doubles, people are going to stop buying it. >> probably go back down to water. >> reporter: lucky for congress, it won't happen right away. the department of agriculture could take weeks to put a new dairy purchase program in place. >> they'll have time enough after the new congress is seated to pass legislation thand eithe extend our previous farm bill or perhaps even pass a new farm bill. >> reporter: but eventually congress will have to agree on something. or a staple at the dinner table could
and stiffer gun control laws but all that's on hold while the fight over taxes and spending rages on. kate? >> kristen welker at the white house tonight. >>> so, what does an impasse mean? for more, wasn't to bring in cnbc's washington bureau chief, john harwood. let's break it down here. if we have no deal tomorrow, by midnight tomorrow, what happens? what is the direct impact on the american taxpayer? >> the biggest impact, kate, would be on the 2 million americans who would lose extended unemployment benefits of around $300 a month. the average family through the loss of the payroll tax cut would lose about $20 a week out of their paycheck and as for the tax withholding, the higher tax rates for people through the income tax code, treasury could put off delaying -- taking more money out of people's paycheck bus they are not inclined to do so unless a deal is imminent on capitol hill. >> the markets were unsettled last week with all the indecision in washington. what are we looking at on wednesday when wall street opens again, if we have no fiscal cliff deal? >> i talked to independent e
of experts. - if i was a dude, i would break the law, just so i could fight with charlie's angels. bring it on, angels! - so, sit back, relax, and get comfy. our top ten cozi countdown starts right now.
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)